Blade Runner 2049 (****) chooses life

There's a lot here for people who loved the first film. For those who just liked it, like yours truly, this bridges some gaps. Not sure where they can go with the next film, if there is one with the same writer, it is sure to be interesting.

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I Don’t Have A Vote: The 89th Annual Oscars – You are ruining Everything

My pick for the best in film this year is a lot closer to what the Academy picked this year. I can almost see it from here when there are no clouds at night. It's somewhere behind Pluto.

Arrival (****1/2) is learning to accept a different language.

For those of us who are interested in good sci-fi, Arrival hits the mark pretty solidly on the head. Approaching the concept of first contact from a practicality rarely seen in films, it asks questions few movies dare to ask.

Sicario (****1/2): The depth of darkness

Villeneuve is one of the best directors alive. He his streak is 3 near-classics and counting. His sensibility is one of quiet observation. He allows the viewer to draw his own conclusions on what they are seeing, without pushing even subtly in any direction.

Enemy (*****) Tangled and Dark

Enemy - 2013 Director Denis Villeneuve Starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Sarah Gadon, Isabella Rossellini, Mélanie Laurent Screenplay by Javier Gullón based on The Double by José Saramago “Chaos is order yet undeciphered.” Enemy is the kind of film that challenges you to absorb every moment. It's not enough just to watch this film, you have to feel it. If you keep … Continue reading Enemy (*****) Tangled and Dark

Prisoners (****) exceeds the grasp of its flaws

Prisoners - 2013 Director Denis Villeneuve Starring Hugh Jackman, Jake Gyllenhaal, Viola Davis, Maria Bello, Terrence Howard, Melissa Leo, Paul Dano, Dylan Minnette Screenplay Aaron Guzikowski One could say that I am not a fan of Paul Dano or Melissa Leo.  They often play detestable creatures; almost always intentionally.  Many of the best parts of their films involve them losing or being hurt in some way. … Continue reading Prisoners (****) exceeds the grasp of its flaws